Following the American Civil War Sesquicentennial with day by day writings of the time, currently 1863.

October 30th. Not much sleep last night. Early in line this morning. Relieved by an Iowa Regiment. Cheers were given for each regiment, then all together for Honest Old Abe. The Iowa boys shouted, “A good time and good luck.” Soon reached the train where a crowd gave cheers for Old Abe, and wishing us a happy time. Singing and cheering as the train moved on towards Baltimore, where we arrived about noon. Nothing important happened as we journeyed along. Pushed across the city to the Philadelphia R. R. station. Then on to Philadelphia, where we arrived late this afternoon. Dinner at the Cooper Shop. Received kind treatment from the people of Philadelphia. A pleasant journey so far. Discussing over the election as we journey along, on towards good old Connecticut.

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Etowah Bridge, Sunday, Oct. 30. A very beautiful Sabbath spent in the usual commonplace way. Grazed in the forenoon. The afternoon occupied in writing to Brother John. Walked to town in the evening. No mail or news, although trains are passing in great numbers.

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Sunday, 30th.—Marched twelve miles and halted one mile from South Florence. Johnston’s Division crossed river five or six miles above Florence, in pontoon boats. A few Yankee cavalry over in Florence, thinking we were some of Roddy’s Cavalry, called us “Buttermilk Rangers,” and said to come over, and were very much surprised when a battery of four or five pieces of artillery replied.

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Sunday, October 30. — Three months to-day since I was captured. Day very dull. Nothing additional from Petersburg.

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Sunday, 30th—We started early this morning and marched fifteen miles. We bivouacked for the night near Cave Springs. Large foraging parties were sent out which brought in great quantities of provisions and feed, this section not having been overrun by our armies. Cave Spring is a little village sixteen miles southwest of Rome, Georgia. The citizens all left their homes on the approach of our army. I was detailed on picket duty. All is quiet.

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Sunday, October 30. — Another beautiful October day. We are having delicious weather. The only shadow on my spirits now is the critical condition of Captain Hastings. So brave, so pure, so good! God grant him life!

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30th. Sunday. Received order relieving me from Q. M. duty and assigned to Co. C. McBride a Q. M. Desire to do God’s will.

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Oct. 30th. Moved back to our old position [Fort Alexander Hayes] in the works.

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Sunday, October 30th.—Bright and beautiful.

Some firing was heard early this morning on the Darbytown road, or in that direction; but it soon ceased, and no fighting of moment is anticipated to-day, for Gen. Longstreet is in the city.

My son Thomas drew a month’s rations yesterday, being detailed for clerical service with Gen. Kemper. He got 35 pounds of flour (market value $70), 31 pounds of beef ($100.75), 3 pounds of rice ($6), one sixth of a cord of wood ($13.33), salt ($2), tobacco ($5), vinegar ($3)—making $200 per month; clothing furnished by government, $500 per annum; cash, $18 per month; $4 per day extra, and $40 per month for quarters; or $5000 per annum. Custis and I get $4000 each—making in all $13,000! Yet we cannot subsist and clothe the family; for, alas, the paper money is $30 for one in specie!

The steamers have brought into Wilmington immense amounts of quartermaster stores, and perhaps our armies are the best clad in the world. If the spirit of speculation be laid, and all the men and resources of the country be devoted to defense (as seems now to be the intention), the United States could never find men and material sufficient for our subjugation. We could maintain the war for an indefinite period, unless, indeed, fatal dissensions should spring up among ourselves.

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October 29th. All things have been quiet with us since the last date. The regiment voted for President. Commissioners were here from Connecticut. Each voter was given two ballots and an envelope. One for Lincoln and one for General McClellan. The voter, taking his ballots to his tent or anywhere he chose, put in the envelope the one of his choice, seal and return to the Commissioners who carried the vote home. I was not old enough to vote. I could carry a gun and do as much duty as any man.

The excitement through the North is great, so it is reported to us, and trouble is expected in the large cities, owing to the anti-war spirit that is cropping out. According to reports many regiments are being sent to the North to hold the toughs in check. Reported late this afternoon we may be sent to New Haven. Hope there won’t be any trouble, for the sake of good old Connecticut. Later orders came for us to prepare to take train for New Haven. Great excitement in camp tonight as we are getting ready to leave in the morning.

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